Disability Awareness for Kids – Its not weird, just different.

I was on a train recently, travelling home from visiting my sister and best friend in London.  After a good night out the evening before, I was feeling quite tired and hoped to pass the journey quietly with my Kindle for company. At one of the stops, a mother with her young daughter got onContinue reading Disability Awareness for Kids – Its not weird, just different.

A little bit of knowledge . . .

As a disabled person, I consider myself to be fairly lucky.  Yes, I face physical challenges on a daily basis but they haven’t stopped me from living a fulfilling life, getting a good education, raising my own family or running my own training business. I was fortunate enough to be born at a time when people’sContinue reading A little bit of knowledge . . .

Facing a diagnosis of Cerebral Palsy: Hope for Parents

  I must admit to being a bit of a soap addict.  I was thrilled to see “Emmerdale” doing their bit for Cerebral Palsy Awareness Month, following the difficult birth of Megan and Jai’s baby girl. The doctors have advised the new parents that due to complications during the birth, which meant the baby sufferedContinue reading Facing a diagnosis of Cerebral Palsy: Hope for Parents

Cerebral Palsy: An Introduction

This month is Cerebral Palsy Awareness Month so I’m going to be sharing a number of articles to raise awareness of the condition, what it’s like to live with it and the challenges that it presents.  Later this month, I’ll also be sharing advice for parents who have a child with CP and maybe someContinue reading Cerebral Palsy: An Introduction

Support for young disabled people and their families

It’s sometimes hard for young disabled people and their families to find the support that they need and even harder to make their voices heard. SENDIAS is a project in West Berkshire which aims to support young disabled people, up to the age of 25 and their parents/carers.  They want young people and those whoContinue reading Support for young disabled people and their families

Now proud Trustee of Cerebral Palsy Sport

At my book launch back in September, one of my guests told me about a charity which was looking for new trustees – Cerebral Palsy Sport.  I wasn’t sure though.  I’ve never been into sport and I wasn’t sure if I’d have the time to commit to the charity. Nonetheless, I decided to take aContinue reading Now proud Trustee of Cerebral Palsy Sport

Ten misconceptions about people with disabilities

    Disabled people need someone to talk for them “Would she like a drink?” or “How old is she?” were common questions posed to my mum when I was growing up.  People assumed just because I am disabled that I can’t speak for myself. I soon piped up with the answers, making sure theyContinue reading Ten misconceptions about people with disabilities

New writing projects – feedback very welcome!

This time last year, my new year’s resolution was to get my memoir, “Does it wet the bed?”, published. It was an ambitious goal as the manuscript was barely finished. But with lots of hard work and determination,  I fulfilled my resolution . . . for once! This year, I have two writing projects whichContinue reading New writing projects – feedback very welcome!

Bringing Disability into the media spotlight

  Having a speech impairment, I’ve always hated the sound of my own voice. Not only that, but I have at times, struggled to make other people understand me. So when I started promoting my first book, “Does it wet the bed?”, my publicists, Literally PR, asked what types of activities I’d be comfortable doing. Continue reading Bringing Disability into the media spotlight

Legislation doesn’t improve knowledge of disability

Since “Does it wet the bed?” was released, I’ve done several interviews for newspapers, magazines and radio shows. Each has focused on different aspects of the book and my life but nearly all of them have included the following (or similar) question: “Have attitudes towards disability changed since you were a child?” My answer hasContinue reading Legislation doesn’t improve knowledge of disability